Suite360

Cyberbullying Education

Suite360

Cyberbullying Education

Suite360:Student and Suite360:Intervention deliver cyberbullying education in the digital world- precisely where the behavior occurred. Cyberbullying education begins with an understanding of digital citizenship, and Suite360 delivers this education to K-12 students, parents and school/district staff.

To learn more about Suite360 and Cyberbullying education, see below and schedule a live demo.

Suite360 Cyberbullying Prevention

Cyberbullying is defined as bullying that takes place using electronic devices. Usually, this takes the form of text messages or social media sites like Snapchat, Twitter, etc. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, 21% of students from the ages of 12 to 18 have experienced cyberbullying.




Cyberbullying is the easiest form of bullying.

Cyberbullying is defined as bullying that takes place using electronic devices. Usually, this takes the form of text messages or social media sites like Snapchat, Twitter, etc. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, 21% of students from the ages of 12 to 18 have experienced cyberbullying.

Cyberbullying is the easiest form of bullying. It provides the bully with anonymity and lets them avoid facing their victims. It allows attacks from anywhere, at any time. Students can find themselves targeted based on their appearance, race, religion, sexual orientation, gender preference or identification, or anything else. Cyberbullying can lead the victim to feel helpless, alone, depressed, sick, and even suicidal. This has been the case of so many school-age students, such as Amanda Todd and Megan Meier, who were bullied until the loneliness and pain caused them to take their own lives.

Unlike bullying, cyberbullying only requires one attack to do irreparable damage. The difficulty with cyberbullying is that pictures or messages can be forwarded and passed on hundreds of times in a few minutes through social media. Some parents have suggested that schools have no jurisdiction with regard to cyberbullying, but courts in the United States have held that schools have recourse in disciplining cyberbullying when it interferes with or creates a disruption in the school.

This abuse of electronic communication raises serious questions. What can educators do to intervene and combat this form of bullying and eliminate it from school campuses? How can educators prepare students and parents to deal with cyberbullying?

It is extremely important to address cyberbullying — not just helping students cope with it, but also effectively eliminating it from schools. The first step is for schools to create specific policies that focus on cyberbullying and delineate the consequences for participating in it. Additionally, the school must establish procedures to help students and parents understand cyberbullying and deal with it appropriately, knowing who to contact and how to gather evidence.

Discussion Questions:
Why is cyberbullying considered the “easiest” form of bullying?

What are the signs to look for when a student is being cyberbullied?

Do schools have a responsibility to address cyberbullying off campus?

How can schools help reduce or eliminate incidents of cyberbullying?

To learn more about cyberbullying programs for your school or district: